CABINET PULLS PART ONE: ROUTED FINGER PULL / by Caroline Wilding

I believe poetry lies in the details of our the environments we build for ourselves. Details like what you touch and how materials come together are the language of architecture. I think no detail is too small to consider, and seeing as there are millions of cabinet pulls to choose from I wanted to do a mini-series of posts on my favorites and the ones have have caught my eye lately.

My favorite pull for Construct clients is a routed finger pull where the pull is routed out of the drawer/doors themselves. I prefer this detail for a number of reasons- it has a clean/ minimal look, it doesn't add ornamentation to the cabinetry, and it won't detract from the finish of the cabinets. In a kitchen with many drawers and doors, ornamental pulls draw too much attention to themselves and the design results in an overly busy appearance. It's flush (doesn't stick out past the face of the cabinet) so there is nothing to scratch your hip or knee when cozying up to a cabinet or furniture piece. Finally, it creates strong horizontal lines that make the cabinets look very tailored.

Below are two examples of routed finger pulls. You can do them in a contrasting material as shown in the first image with the walnut wood pull/ white cabinet, or match the finish as in the second image for a more subtle look. 

 Walnut routed finger pull with contrasting white cabinet face.

Walnut routed finger pull with contrasting white cabinet face.

 White gloss cabinets with matching finger pulls.

White gloss cabinets with matching finger pulls.